part of my ongoing gross digital salute to the fantastic possibilities of life on the internet.
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just chillin

just chillin

the most beautiful dream and most terrible nightmare #vscocam

the most beautiful dream and most terrible nightmare #vscocam

found the manual for the Apple II Language System

found the manual for the Apple II Language System

comfy dog

comfy dog

it seems that everyone loves a picture of a cat

it seems that everyone loves a picture of a cat

hanging out at home #vscocam

hanging out at home #vscocam

mpdrolet:

A horse and rider watch as the space shuttle Enterprise is towed from a Rockwell International facility in Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base for a year of flight tests, Jan 31, 1977
Art Rogers

mpdrolet:

A horse and rider watch as the space shuttle Enterprise is towed from a Rockwell International facility in Palmdale to Edwards Air Force Base for a year of flight tests, Jan 31, 1977

Art Rogers

(via krispayne)

Peer review basically absent

sbidleman:

A new article from the American Educational Research Association finds that less than one percent of articles published in top education research journals are replication studies, even though replicating important findings is essential for improving usefulness of research for policymakers and practitioners. The report analyzes the complete publication history of the current 100 education journals with the highest five-year “impact factor” (how often articles are cited in other scholarly work), finding only 0.13 percent of published articles were replications. Contrary to medicine but similar to psychology, nearly 68 percent of replications successfully replicate findings of original studies, 19.5 percent have mixed results (supporting some, but not all, findings), and 13.1 percent fail to replicate any original findings. Replications were significantly less likely to succeed when there was no overlap in authorship between original and replicating articles. Replications conducted by completely new researchers were successful 54 percent of the time; when conducted by original authors in the same publication, 88.7 percent were successful. Replications in a new publication but with at least one author on both original and replicating studies had a 70.6 percent success rate.  Currently, one in 500 education studies are replications, an increase from one in 2,000 in 1990.

(Source: edr.sagepub.com)